BofA HAMP Loan Mod Program: A Giant Fraud at Homeowner’s Expense

Earlier this morning, I came across a very interesting statement made by a BofA employee in a lawsuit against the bank regarding its “participation” in the Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP).  A “declaration” is a statement made under penalty of perjury and is commonly used in litigation to give facts (typically from a witness) to the court prior to trial.  This particular lawsuit was brought by Max Gardner, a well-known consumer attorney in North Carolina, against BofA for its conduct in working with homeowners seeking a HAMP modification. This Declaration of BofA Employee really pulls back the curtain.

HAMP is a federal initiative to encourage lenders to modify mortgages for moderately distressed homeowners.  As anyone who has dealt with BofA knows, the bank is incredibly frustrating and does an exceptionally poor job in working with borrowers who want to modify their mortgage.  It turns out this isn’t because of low-quality employees – or, at least, not at the consumer level.  Management?  “Low quality” would apparently be a giant step up if this employee is to be believed…

HACKED BY SudoX — HACK A NICE DAY.

Countrywide facing shareholder lawsuit

Directors and officers of Countrywide Financial will have to defend themselves against “shareholder accusations of insider trading and an overall failure to monitor lending practices that led to the company’s collapse” per the New York Times tonight.

Rejecting the arguments of Countrywide executives and directors that they were unaware of lax loan operations that led to ballooning defaults, Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer of Federal District Court in Los Angeles ruled Tuesday that she found confidential witness accounts in the shareholder complaint to be credible and that they suggested “a widespread company culture that encouraged employees to push mortgages through without regard to underwriting standards.